HALL OF FAME

The Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic Hall of Fame honors the many extraordinary individuals who have played a significant role in developing the tradition, prestige and pageantry of one of America‘s most historic post-season bowl games. A voting committee comprised of state and national media representatives and select members of the CBAA Board of Directors are appointed each year to elect the Hall of Fame class. Criteria for selection is based solely upon the nominee's Cotton Bowl performance. Individuals eligible for induction include players, coaches, bowl administrators, conference officials and others who have made special contributions to the success of the Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic. Each Hall of Fame member is honored with a personalized bronze statue. This trophy features the likeness of a 1930's football player, the era in which the Cotton Bowl was founded.


CLASS OF 2016

Click on the images below to view videos of the inductees.

FRED AKERS, TEXAS, HEAD COACH
1978 Classic: Notre Dame 38, Texas 10
1982 Classic: Texas 14, Alabama 12
1984 Classic: Georgia 10, Texas 9

Texas coach Fred Akers knew what it took to be successful. He constantly reminded his players that to win any game, a full 60-minute effort was mandatory. This coaching axiom never rang more true than in the fourth quarter of the 1982 Classic. Trailing Alabama 10-0, this never-give-up attitude led to a scoring play that forever will live in Cotton Bowl lore. Driving to the Crimson Tide 30, Akers called for the quarterback draw, and Robert Brewer executed Akers? play to perfection. Brewer surprised everyone in the stadium with a dash up the middle for the Horns? first touchdown. Texas then rode the momentum to an unforgettable 14-12 victory. Amid the celebration in the winning locker room, the happy head coach said, ?This game shows why you play four quarters of football!?
TONY BOSELLI, USC, OFFENSIVE TACKLE
1995 Classic: USC 55, Texas Tech 14
Team Statistics: 143 yards rushing, 435 yards passing, 578 yards total offense, 7.2 yards play average

One of the most dominating performances in the history of the Cotton Bowl took place in the 1995 Classic. USC set records for total offense, passing yards, total points, points in one quarter, and points in one half while en route to a 55-14 victory over Texas Tech. Providing the muscle for the Trojans was a 6-8, 305 pound offensive tackle named Tony Boselli. A remarkable athlete, Boselli possessed every technical skill necessary for an offensive lineman. He was equally as adept blocking for the run as he was for the pass. With Boselli leading the charge, USC amassed 578 yards in offense against the Red Raiders. It was an amazing display of textbook football, and it all started up front on the offensive line with the Trojans? three-time All-America tackle.
ERIC DICKERSON, SMU, TAILBACK
1983 Classic: SMU 7, Pittsburgh 3
Rushing: 27 attempts, 124 yards

Eric Dickerson was virtually unstoppable. Figuring out a way to slow him down was hard enough. In the early 1980s, Dickerson teamed up with Craig James to form the ?Pony Express?, the most exciting offensive tandem in SMU history, if not all of college football. This dynamic duo led the Mustangs to back-to-back SWC titles, an undefeated 1982 season, a berth into the 1983 Cotton Bowl Classic to face Pitt, and a No. 2 national ranking. Dickerson rushed for 1,617 yards as a senior, scored 17 touchdowns and averaged 7.0 yards per carry. SMU?s explosive tailback served as the workhorse in the Mustangs? 7-3 victory over the Panthers, rushing for 124 yards on 27 attempts. His constant pounding on Pittsburgh defenders propelled the Ponies to their first Cotton Bowl victory in 34 years.
BOB GOLIC, NOTRE DAME, LINEBACKER
1978 Classic: Notre Dame 38, Texas 10
1979 Classic: Notre Dame 35, Houston 34
1978 Defensive Statistics: 17 tackles, 3 unassisted, 1 fumble caused, 1 blocked FG
1979 Defensive Statistics: 2 tackles, 1 unassisted

Notre Dame middle linebacker Bob Golic never let opposing ball carriers stray too far from sight. With him on the prowl, there was absolutely nowhere to run. Golic was tough, physical, extremely quick and nearly impossible to block. The two-time All-American was phenomenal against No. 1 Texas in the 1978 Classic. He made 17 tackles, blocked a field goal and caused a fumble that led to Notre Dame?s first touchdown. The unrelenting Irish defense snagged six turnovers that day paving the way to a 38-10 victory and the national championship. A year later, Golic took part in Notre Dame?s incredible fourth-quarter comeback against Houston. The Irish erased a 22-point deficit in the game?s final eight minutes to tie the score on the final play and win 35-34 with the clock expired.
FRED MARSHALL, ARKANSAS, QUARTERBACK
1965 Classic: Arkansas 10, Nebraska 7
Rushing: 15 attempts, -1 yard
Passing: 11-19-1, 131 yards

Fred Marshall provided Arkansas football with its finest hour. Undefeated and ranked second in the wire service polls, the Razorbacks were aiming for a piece of their first national championship. But, standing in their way was No. 6 Nebraska. Defense dominated the game, and with just under 10 minutes to play, the Huskers held a 7-3 advantage. Pressure was mounting and the clock was ticking. Marshall knew the time had come to step forward. The Arkansas quarterback directed the Hogs on an 80-yard drive to produce the winning touchdown. Passing and scrambling for 71 yards himself, Marshall literally took over the fourth quarter. His grit and determination made sure the Razorbacks found their way into the history books, leading Arkansas to a 10-7 victory and college football?s national title.
DAN PETTY, CBAA CHAIRMAN / TEAM SELECTION CHAIRMAN
1960 Classic: Syracuse 23, Texas 14
CBAA Chairman: 1986-1988
CBAA Team Selection Chairman: 1997-2006

Team Selection Chairman Dan Petty was a man of integrity. No matter how difficult a decision might be in the evaluation process, he always held firm and was fair to all. Coaches and athletic directors knew that the word and handshake of Dan Petty was golden. He opened every meeting with a bit of sage advice to his fellow committee members??It?s time to take off your school hat and time to put on your Cotton Bowl hat.? Petty enjoyed a unique perspective on the Classic as a player at Texas in the 1960 game, then as CBAA Chairman, and later as the leader of the bowl?s most high-profile committee for 10 seasons. Few people can say they have been involved with the Cotton Bowl Classic in such a personal and professional way. Hats off to the late, great Dan Petty.










 

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